Recommended Reading: June 16

If you read one article this weekend, look at No Victory for Religious Liberty by Darel Paul.

If you have more reading time, check out the following selections gathered from around the blogging world. Happy reading! Continue reading

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Recommended Reading: May 26

If you read one article, reflect over The Amish Understand a Life-Changing Truth about Technology by Michael Coren.

For those of you with additional reading time this weekend, check out the following suggestions, gathered (as always) from around the interwebs. Think I missed sharing something important? Let me know in a comment below. Happy reading! Continue reading

Recommended Reading: May 12

If you read one article this week, engage Evangelical Gnosticism by Abigail Rine Favale

For those of you with additional reading time this fine Spring day, check out the following selections, gathered from around the interwebs. Happy reading!

Theology and Churchworld

Lessons from the Worst Sermon I Ever Heard by Mike McKinley

Pope Francis, Nondenominationalist? by John Ehrett

Southern Baptist Women Launch Petition Against Paige Patterson by Kate Shellnutt

Miracles and Modernity by Benjamin Winter

Biblical Studies and the History of Christianity

April Biblical Studies Carnival by Ruben Rus

Gospels and Names by Larry Hurtado

Does Genesis Make Claims about History? by RJS

How Present Technology Changes Our View of Past Technology by Peter Gurry

Worldviews and Culture

“Avoidance Is Not Purity”: An Ode to the Pence Rule by Eric Hutchinson

Should Abused Women (or Men) Stay with Their Spouses? by Roger Olson

The Myth of Disenchantment by Peter Leithart

Empty Hands by Johanna Byrkett

Listening to Destitute Minds

I believe we suffer from a propensity to look at people with whom we disagree and say to ourselves, “That person can’t teach me anything. They are so wrong in how they think, so insufficient in their intellectual capacities, so distorted in their worldview, that I could not possibly see reality more clearly by interacting with this person.”

Think of the political divide. Republicans decry working with “the other side” as a compromise of values. In turn, Democrats seriously question the sanity and morality of those who disagree with their principles. Both sides react with disdain when anyone seeks a third way for moving forward.

Consider the culture wars. One side sees evil lurking everywhere.Government, the news, schools, technology–-all are trying to poison the hearts and minds of the faithful. The other side sees the forces of corruption, corporate task masters, and institutional suppression reigning supreme, preventing people from experiencing true liberation.

Think of what is now 500 years of theological division (non-Chalcedonian and Orthodox brethren aside, of course). For some, the Reformation was the moment of freedom, the removal of the shackles of theological corruption, the purification of doctrine and practice, and remains a cause for great celebration. For others, the Reformation was a grave mistake, a continued blight on the landscape of Christianity, a massive embarrassment, a destruction of unity that should be mourned, not celebrated.

The very way in which we talk to and interact with others is poisoned by the mindset, “You’re wrong. I cannot learn from you.” Too often, the logic is frighteningly simple: Someone is different than me. Since I’m right, that someone is wrong. Therefore, they have nothing of value to offer me or my tribe. Continue reading