Predestination and Freewill: Modern Scholars on Romans 7-9, Part I

This post is part of our ongoing series examining Romans, Predestination, and Freewill. Having now viewed Luther and Erasmus’ perspectives on soteriological material in Romans, we turn to a survey of modern Biblical studies concerning the proper interpretation and meaning of Paul’s Letter to the Church at Rome. Here we must note the plethora ofContinue reading “Predestination and Freewill: Modern Scholars on Romans 7-9, Part I”

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Predestination and Freewill: On the Bondage of the Will, Part II

This post is part of our ongoing series on Romans, Predestination, and Freewill. In The Bondage of the Will, Luther also argues that if the potter and clay in Romans 9 do not refer to God and man in salvation, “Paul’s whole argument in defense of grace is meaningless. For the whole purpose of hisContinue reading “Predestination and Freewill: On the Bondage of the Will, Part II”

Book Review: Religion in Human Evolution (Bellah)

Robert Bellah’s Religion in Human Evolution stands as magnum opus of breathtaking proportions. Developed from the Merlin Donald’s work on cultural evolution, Karl Jasper’s insights on the axial age, and drawing upon a range of historical, anthropological, and biological sources, Bellah traces the evolution of religion within human culture from its origins in primordial playContinue reading “Book Review: Religion in Human Evolution (Bellah)”

Recommended Readings: December 20-26

If you only engage a single article this week, make it Christmas is Undefeatable by Mark Tooley. If you have more time this Christmas season to do some reading, check out these other suggestions from the past several days. As always, if you think there is something else I should be reading, let me knowContinue reading “Recommended Readings: December 20-26”

Predestination and Freewill: On the Bondage of the Will, Part I

This post is part of our ongoing series on Romans, Predestination, and Freewill. We now turn to Martin Luther’s response to Erasmus in his De Servo Arbitrio (Or On the Bondage of the Will).[1] In addition to responding, Luther also outlined his own fully developed soteriological theology concerning the roles of human will and GodContinue reading “Predestination and Freewill: On the Bondage of the Will, Part I”

Predestination and Freewill: On the Freedom of the Will, Part II

This post is part of our ongoing series examining Romans, Predestination, and Freewill. In addressing the relationship between divine foreknowledge and human will, Erasmus concludes that while Paul does not adequately address the question,[1] “the will of God, since it is the principle cause of all that takes place, seems to impose necessarily on ourContinue reading “Predestination and Freewill: On the Freedom of the Will, Part II”

Predestination and Freewill: On the Freedom of the Will, Part I

This post is part of our ongoing series on Romans, Predestination, and Freewill. Erasmus wrote Freedom of the Will, at least in part, as a response to Luther’s response to the Papal Bull of Leo X in his Assertio.[1] In Freedom of the Will, Erasmus took issue with Luther writing that “I was wrong inContinue reading “Predestination and Freewill: On the Freedom of the Will, Part I”

Predestination and Freewill: Context and Early Erasmus

This post is part of our ongoing series on Romans, Predestination, and Freewill. Before moving to fully Luther and Erasmus, we must note a similarity between the early and late-medieval interpreters of scripture. Augustine, Pelagius, Luther, and Erasmus each writes in manner that takes a ‘proof-text’ approach to concepts and ideas that can be foundContinue reading “Predestination and Freewill: Context and Early Erasmus”

Book Review: Every Man’s Battle (Aterburn and Stoeker)

Recently I had the opportunity to read Every Man’s Battle by Stephen Arterburn and Fred Stoeker. Having previously read Every Young Man’s Battle while in High School, I looked forward to reading this book, recalling their paradigm influencing suggestions concerning purity that I had previously engaged. In reading this book, I was not disappointed.