Writing

Publications

“Rules and Roles for Women: Vocation and Order in the Apostolic Fathers.” Southern Baptist Journal of Theology 22.4 (2018): 77-100.

“Reading Across Traditions: Comparing the Theological Anthropologies of Ramanuja and Augustine of Hippo.” Journal of Comparative Theology 5 (2015): 40-57.

Discerning Witnesses: First and Second Century Textual Studies in Christian Authority. Thesis. Ann Arbor: ProQuest UMI Publishing, 2014.

Book Reviews

Udo Schnelle, The First One Hundred Years of Christianity: An Introduction to Its History, Literature, and Developments, translated by James Thompson (Baker Academic, 2020), reviewed for Modern Reformation 29, 6 (2020): 58-61.

Jennifer Strawbridge, The Pauline Effect: The Use of the Pauline Epistles by Early Christian Writers (DeGruyter, 2015), reviewed for The Journal of the Bible and Its Reception 4, 1 (2017): 171-173.

John G. Gager, Who Made Earliest Christianity? The Jewish Lives of the Apostle Paul (Columbia, 2015), reviewed for The Heythrop Journal 57, 4 (2016): 713.

Scott J. Hafemann, Paul’s Message and Ministry in Covenant Perspective: Selected Essays (Cascade, 2015), reviewed for The Heythrop Journal 57, 4 (2016): 717-718.

Roland Boer, The Sacred Economy of Ancient Israel (WJKO, 2015), reviewed for Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 59, 1 (2016): 148-150.

Paul Copan and Matt Flannagan, Did God Really Command Genocide? Coming to Terms with the Justice of God (Baker, 2014), reviewed for Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 58, 4 (2015): 818-20.


Blog

Paul and Justin on the Ancestry of Abraham

This post is part of an ongoing series on Paul and Pneuma, Justin and Judaism. Paul refers to Abraham nineteen times in his undisputed letters, often citing God’s promise to Abraham, his faith, or status as intermediary.[1] Key for Paul’s theology was the genealogical function Abraham filled. Galatians 3:1-9 suggests that, for Paul, Abrahamic sonshipContinue reading “Paul and Justin on the Ancestry of Abraham”

Paul and Justin on Pneuma

This post is part of an ongoing series on Paul and Pneuma, Justin and Judaism. Turning to Justin’s views on pneuma, it is instructive that the Dialogue opens with reflections on his philosophical journey to Christianity, wherein he remarks that he learned “nothing new about God” while studying under the tutelage of a Stoic (Dial.Continue reading “Paul and Justin on Pneuma”

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