Rules and Roles for Women

I’m excited to share that my article, “Rules and Roles for Women: Vocation and Order in the Apostolic Fathers,” was recently published in the Southern Baptist Journal of Theology. This research was originally undertaken as part of a doctoral seminar at St. Louis University led by Dr. Carolyn Osiek, and I presented my findings at the Evangelical Theological Society’s regional conference in 2017.

Click here to view a PDF of my article. And click here to view the contents of the entire journal.

Thanks to the SBJT for publishing the research!

Job Postings: Saint Louis University

SLUI wanted to alert readers to TWO tenure track positions which have recently opened up at Saint Louis University.  The first is a Hebrew Bible/Old Testament position and the second is a (somewhat more broad) Constructive Christian Theological Studies position. Knowing first hand the quality of the professors at SLU and the direction the Theological Studies department is headed in, I encourage qualified candidates to check out these opportunities.

Welcoming Bree

Hayley and I welcomed Bree Carolyn Prahlow into the world on Wednesday (8.10) around 6am. Though several weeks early, Bree weighed in at 6lbs 11oz and is doing great (as is mom)!

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After a couple of days in the hospital, we three hope to head home today. Thanks to everyone for the congratulations and encouragement. We are so blessed to have a healthy, happy daughter and are so looking forward to the days, weeks, months, and years to come.

~Jake and Hayley

Christmas Letter 2015

Christmas Greetings Friends and Family!

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At Forest Park

We hope that this Christmas letter finds you adequately recovering from your holiday festivities and eagerly awaiting the arrival of our new year. We had grand plans for this year’s Christmas letter. “Perhaps a Christmas poem,” we told ourselves. “But even if it’s not that creative, we can certainly write a detailed, thoughtful, and picture filled letter. At the very least, we’ll get it out on time. Maybe even as a ‘real’ letter this year.” But alas, the busyness of the Christmas season claimed our ambitious plans and presented us only with this electronic missive for our fourth family Christmas letter. Continue reading

Blogging and Saint Patrick

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Saint Louis University

The past two weekends have been especially busy, as I’ve attended and presented at two conferences. The first was ‘That They May Be One’: The Past, Present, and Future of Orthodox-Catholic Dialogue”, hosted by Saint Louis University and the St. Irenaeus Orthodox Theological Institute. Though I am neither Orthodox or Catholic (yet, as my colleagues like to remind me), I really enjoyed this conference, especially keynote speaker Fr. John Daley of Notre Dame. I had the opportunity to present a paper titled “Blogging Ecumenically: The Present and Future of Online Orthodox-Catholic Dialogue” based on my experiences as managing editor at Conciliar Post. I’ve been running this paper as a series here the past couple of weeks, but I’ve also posted the full version of the paper to my Academia.edu profile. (You can also comment below if you’d like me to send you the paper.) Continue reading

Blogging Ecumenically: A Way Forward

This post is part of an ongoing series reflecting on Orthodox-Catholic online dialogue, originally delivered at the “That They May Be One” Conference.

Conciliar PostIn this series, I have drawn upon the ecumenical website Conciliar Post in order to examine how Orthodox and Catholic Christians dialogue in an online environment. Through this overview, I have argued for three basic approaches to dialogue: Cooperation against common opponents, Reinforcement of disagreements, and Coordination seeking unity. While cooperation and reinforcement must (to some extent) exist in a divided church, intentional Orthodox-Catholic coordination appears to be best way forward toward meaningful Christian dialogue and unity. Continue reading

Blogging Ecumenically: Coordination

This post is part of an ongoing series reflecting on Orthodox-Catholic online dialogue, originally delivered at the “That They May Be One” Conference.

bigstock-dialogue-between-man-and-woman-25597598The third category of dialogue between Orthodox and Catholic writers at Conciliar Post involves what I call “coordination seeking unity.” These types of interaction consist of Orthodox and Catholic voices not only agreeing accidentally or for the sake of defeating a common opponent, but also instances where agreements are sought for the sake of broad Christian unity. In contrast to cooperative approaches where arguments are presented from the Catholic or Orthodox perspective alone, coordinated approaches argue from positions of broad Christian faith (casting the Church as whole) or the perspectives of Orthodoxy and Catholicism together. Continue reading

Blogging Ecumenically: Reinforcement

This post is part of an ongoing series reflecting on Orthodox-Catholic online dialogue, originally delivered at the “That They May Be One” Conference.

thA second way in which Orthodox and Catholic writers at Conciliar Post dialogue with one another is through what I call “reinforcement,” namely, a reinforcement of disagreements. In these instances, after a) recognition of historical Orthodox-Catholic differences coming into play or b) a time of attempting to reconcile potentially non-synchronous positions, Orthodox and Catholic writers agree to disagree and effectively break off dialogue on whatever issue causes the disagreement at hand. Continue reading

Blogging Ecumenically: Cooperation

This post is part of an ongoing series reflecting on Orthodox-Catholic online dialogue, originally delivered at the “That They May Be One” Conference.

shutterstock_91130885First, there is Orthodox-Catholic cooperation, especially cooperation against common theological opponents. Depending on the topic, these opponents can range from secular perspectives to Protestants or from those who disregard church history to those denigrating the liturgy. When discussing such topics, Orthodox and Roman Catholic writers “go to bat” for their fellow writers, offering Catholic or Orthodox arguments in defense of each other’s positions. Continue reading