October 2018 Biblical Studies Carnival

Welcome to the October 2018 Biblical Studies Carnival—and Happy All Saints’ Day!

I’m honored to be hosting this honorable event on this sacred day of remembering all those who have gone before in faith. Before we get on with the business of remembering all the best Biblical Studies articles from this past month, first the business of future carnivals.

  • Bob McDonald will be hosting the November 2018 carnival (due December 1, 2018).
  • Christopher Scott will be hosting the December 2018 carnival (due January 1, 2019).

As carnival Godfather Phil Long has made clear in recent months, we need additional volunteers for future carnivals—especially for January 2019 and forward. If you’re interested in hosting, contact the good doctor (email, @plong42) and let him know your availability. And speaking of Phil, I want to thank him for continuing to curate these carnivals.

Now, on to the main attractions, which have been categorized in the following groups: Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, New Testament, Early Christianity, Reading Phil Long, Theology and Hermeneutics, Book Reviews, and News. Happy reading! Continue reading

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Women in the Apostolic Fathers: Bibliography

This post is the final in our series on Women in the Apostolic Fathers. For a complete copy of this paper, please email me at prahlowjj [at] slu.edu.

Ancient Syriac ManuscriptAncient Sources

Acts of Thecla. Edited and translated by Jeremy W. Barrier. The Acts of Paul and Thecla: A Critical Introduction and Commentary. WUNT 2, 270. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2009.

Apostolic Constitutions. Edited and translated by Alexander Roberts, James Donaldson, and A. Cleveland Cox. Ante-Nicene Fathers: Volume 7: Fathers of the third and Fourth Centuries. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1951. Continue reading

February 2016 Biblical Studies Carnival

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Welcome to the February 2016 Biblical Studies Carnival!

Assembled below are the very best articles written this past month from around the Biblioblogging world.  I know this because I spent the extra day of February tracking down and reading a plethora of fascinating offerings. This month’s carnival includes submissions from the categories of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, New Testament, Early Christianity, Theology and Hermeneutics, Book Reviews, Tools and Resources, and News. May you find them as informative as I did.

Before leaping into this February’s readings, I encourage you to also visit Manuel HG’s Spanish Language Carnival.  Looking forward to future Carnivals, N. T. Wrong (email) will be hosting March’s Carnival. The April offering will come via That Jeff Carter Was Here. May’s Carnival will be moderated by Brian Renshaw (email). Finally, the June festivities will be hosted by Kris Lyle (@KristopherLyle). If you’re interested in signing up to host a future Biblical Studies Carnival, contact Phil Long (email or @plong42).  My thanks again to Phil Long for managing the carnival rotation and giving me the opportunity to host this month. Happy reading!

Continue reading

MHT: Select Bibliography

Below is a select bibliography for the series I’ve been running for the past month on Method and Historical Theology. Any additional readings and resources that you have found useful would be appreciated.

Select Bibliography

Acton, John. “Inaugural Lecture on the Study of History.” In Essays on Freedom and Power. Edited by Gertrude Himmelfarb. New York: Meridian, 1956.

Berkofer, Robert. “The Challenge of Poetics to (Normal) Historical Practice.” Pages 139-157 in The Postmodern History Reader. Edited by Keith Jenkins. New York: Routledge, 1997.

Bloch, Marc. The Historian’s Craft. New York: Vintage, 1964. Continue reading

The Marcion Problem: Select Bibliography

Marcion of Sinope

Marcion of Sinope

Over the past several months, I have been running a series entitled “The Marcion Problem,” where I have been examining Marcion of Sinope’s influence on the development of the New Testament canon. In light of yesterday’s final post in this particular series, I felt it worthwhile to post my select bibliography from this project. As I am currently revising a version of this series for a paper, any additional resources on Marcion would be appreciated. Continue reading

New Testament/Early Christianity Timeline

One of my academic projects includes working toward a historical G.U.T. (Grand Unified Theory) of the early history of Christianity. This type of project is by no means a new endeavor, though this doesn’t stop me from pouring over timelines and historical reconstructions to appropriate information for my own work.

As a starting point for this work, I’ve crafted two timelines of early Christianity: one reflecting the Scholarly “Consensus” (recognizing the difficulty of using that term) and one reflecting an alternative chronology. Continue reading

March Biblical Studies Carnival

Color March 2015 BSCWelcome to the March 2015 Biblical Studies Carnival!

In honor of March’s patron saint (Patrick) and in lieu of what would have been a terrible attempt at an April Fool’s Day joke, start off your morning by (re)visiting the classic “St. Patrick’s Bad Analogies of the Trinity.

Before delving into this month’s suggested articles, I would like to thank Phil Long for asking me to host this carnival. Looking forward to future Carnivals, Jeff Carter will be hosting April’s Carnival. The May Carnival will be hosted by Claude Mariottini, Professor of Old Testament at Northern Baptist Seminary. In June, Cambridge doctoral candidate William A. Ross will be moderating this forum. There are plenty of open Carnival spots for the rest of the year, so if you are interested in hosting, contact Phil Long.

Without further ado, then, check out this month’s selection of posts below (and be sure to look over the “News” section for some exciting ongoing/upcoming events in the world of Biblical Studies).

Continue reading

Book Review: Maxwell Leadership Bible (Thomas Nelson)

Maxwell Leadership BibleIn case you haven’t visited a bookstore of any kind lately or don’t just browse around Amazon for the fun of it (hey, grad students can dream, right?), let me offer you a tidbit of information: there are a LOT of Bibles available today—literally, tons of Bibles. There are different translations, various styles, made for diverse audiences, contrasting theologies at work—to say nothing of the plethora of languages in which the Bible is now available. In many ways, this dissemination of Bibles is good—people have more access to better translations and more applicable versions of the scriptures than at any other time in history. Yet the sheer smorgasbord of options is not without its problems, namely, which Bible should you read? Continue reading

Book Review: NIV College Devotional Bible (Zondervan)

College Devotional BIbleCollege students are busy, with class, homework, living on their own, a social life, and (often) work vying for their time. Amidst this busyness, it’s relatively easy to neglect the more important things in life, like reading your Bible. To help address this problem, Zondervan has released the New International Version College Devotional Bible.

The College Devotional Bible is intended to encourage Bible reading among college students by emphasizing regular devotions and a series of reading plans that help keep students in the scriptures. Included in this Bible are 222 devotionals, which include a scripture reading, a short devotional story (historic, pastoral, or narrative), and reflection questions. These are generally good devotional moments, geared toward busy students and the questions they may come across while at college. While it would have been helpful to have an index of all these devotions, having them tucked within the contexts of the scriptures serves as a good encouragement to read this Bible along with the devotional content. Continue reading

In the Mail: September 16

Yesterday in the mail I received the Catholic Bible Dictionary (edited by Scott Hahn), courtesy of Random House and Blogging for Books. While I’m not Roman Catholic (for more on that, check out our Church Search), I have long appreciated the work of Scott Hahn and I’m eager to see what this dictionary has to offer. As you can see from the photo, I also have received the NIV College Devotional Bible to review, courtesy of Zondervan. Expect to see reviews of these works up in the next couple of weeks.20140916_192658

“Scott Hahn’s writings and conferences have been so effective in bringing Catholics closer to Sacred Scripture. His valuable Catholic Bible Dictionary will be another big help to faithful Catholics who have taken seriously the Church’s encouragement to become immersed in God’s Word.” —Most Reverend Timothy M. Dolan, Archbishop of New York