SSP: Confessio 55 and Psalm 54

This post is part of an ongoing series on the Scriptures of Saint Patrick of Ireland.

Confessio 55 & Psalm 54:22  
Patrick O’Loughlin (168) ‘Cast your burden on God, and he will sustain you.’
  Bieler (88) & Conneely (48) Jacta cogitatum tuum in Deum et ipse te enutriet.
Psalm 54:22    
  Vulgate (54:23) proice super Dominum caritatem tuam et ipse enutriet te
  B (5th c. Italy) Jacta in Dominum curam tuam et ipse te enutriet
  Anglo-Saxon Psalter (8th c.) Jacta in Deum cogitatum tuum, et ipse te enutriet
  Roman Psalter (4th c.) Jacta in Deum cogitatum tuum;  et ipse te enutriet

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SSP: Confessio 5 and Psalm 50

This post is part of an ongoing series on the Scriptures of Saint Patrick of Ireland.

Confessio 5 & Psalm 50:15
Patrick O’Loughlin (145) ‘Call upon me in the day of trouble; I will deliver you, and you shall glorify’.
Bieler (60) & Conneely (30) Invoca me in die tribulationis tuae et liberabo te et magnificabis me.
Psalm 50:15
Vulgate (49:15) Et invoca me in die tribulationis liberabo te et glorificabis me
b (5th c. Italy)[1] Et invoca me in die tribulationis et eximam te et glorificabi me
Anglo-Saxon Psalter (8th c.)[2] Invoca me in die tribulationis; eripam te, et magnificabis me.
Irish Psalter (8th-9th c.) Et invoca me in die tribulationis; liberabo te, et glorificabis me.

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SSP: The Contents of Patrick’s Bible (Part I)

This post is part of an ongoing series on the Scriptures of Saint Patrick of Ireland.

Gospel Writers

Gospel Writers

Patrick’s overarching approach to the scriptures in hand, I now turn to some more specific considerations of his citations from the Old and New Testaments. Of central importance for Patrick were the Gospels (primarily Matthew and Luke), Pauline Epistles (especially Romans and the Corinthian correspondences), and the Psalter.[1] To briefly touch on the value of these writings for Patrick, the Gospels served not only as the source for knowing Christ Jesus, but also provided the missionary impetus which guided Patrick’s life. His quotation of Matthew 24:14 and 28:19-20 in Confessio 40 stands as the clearest example of how these biblical texts provide the foundation for Patrick’s life and work.[2] Continue reading

SSP: The Vulgate

This post is part of an ongoing series on the Scriptures of Saint Patrick of Ireland.

Vulgate

Vulgate

The second major Latin version of the Bible circulating in the Middle Ages was the Vulgate. Commissioned by Pope Damasus in 383 CE, the Vulgate is commonly attributed as the work of Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus or, as he is better known, Jerome.[1] Jerome’s real contribution to the Vulgate came through his translation of the Hebrew text of the Old Testament (contra the Vetus Latina, which was largely translated from the Septuagint).[2] His revision of the Vetus Latina New Testament was just that—a revision—and in some of the later portions of the New Testament, even that term seems a bit strong for the way in which Jerome used the Vetus Latina to produce a “new” translation.[3] This leads to the complication that, for later portions of the New Testament, it is often quite difficult to distinguish between the Vetus Latina and Vulgate versions.[4] Continue reading

The Scriptures of Saint Patrick: The Medieval Scriptural World

This post is part of an ongoing series on the Scriptures of Saint Patrick of Ireland.

BibleTwo factors shaped the used and form of Patrick’s scriptural context, namely, the “lack of early medieval pandects (single-volume Bibles) and the fundamentally liturgical quality of early medieval biblical books….”[1] There is no doubt that the Bible’s liturgical use underscored its importance during the early medieval period. In the words of Susan Boynton, “The Bible permeated the medieval Latin liturgy: biblical narratives and themes lay behind the fundamental structures of the liturgical year, and scriptural texts were ubiquitous in the form of chants and readings.”[2] In short, the Bible and its message of the Lord Jesus prominently occupied the medieval Christian worldview through liturgical structures, be they liturgical readings, hymnody, the liturgical calendar, biblical interpretation, or communal feast days. Continue reading