300 Books for the Educated Christian Mind

As a follower of Jesus, I believe it’s important to love God with all of who we are: our hearts, souls, and minds. Much has been said about this last aspect of our humanity, most of it better than I could say it here. But as I pursue veritas with my life and mind, someContinue reading “300 Books for the Educated Christian Mind”

Ep16: Resuming Church Debates

This episode kicks off the second semester of the Church Debates series with some preliminary remarks, an overview of the Reformation and post-Reformation periods to be covered, and takes a look at some important theological points from Anselm and Aquinas.

Ep7: Should Christians Engage Philosophy?

In this podcast, the Church Debate series continues with a discussion of whether or not Christians should engage philosophy. The perspectives of Tertullian and Justin Martyr serve as the basis for our conversation.

Book Review: Understanding the Times (Myers and Noebel)

Every so often a book comes along and truly rewrites the paradigms of a field. Some twenty-five years ago, David Noebel penned such a book, titled Understanding the Times. In this 900-page tome Noebel outlined the clash between competing worldviews – ways of viewing and interpreting the world – which were occurring throughout in theContinue reading “Book Review: Understanding the Times (Myers and Noebel)”

Book Review: Did God Really Command Genocide? (Copan and Flannagan)

Any contemporary reader who picks up the Bible will be struck by the seeming divide between the God of Jesus Christ and the God who commands the destruction of whole nations and the obliteration of Canaanites during Israel’s conquest of the Promised Land. And while many Christians simply don’t think about the possible difficulties ofContinue reading “Book Review: Did God Really Command Genocide? (Copan and Flannagan)”

Platonism and Paul?

The dialogue between faith and reason has long held a place of prominence in the Christian tradition. Sometimes this relationship has been understood positively—construed in the words of Anselm of Canterbury as “faith seeking understanding”—and other times it has been construed negatively—perhaps best represented by Tertullian of Carthage when he asked, “What has Athens toContinue reading “Platonism and Paul?”

C. S. Lewis on Myth (Part IV)

This post is the final in our series examining C. S. Lewis’s view of “myth.” Lewis gives perhaps his clearest exposition on myth in his essay entitled “Myth Became Fact“. Lewis begins this essay with the idea that he is going to refute his friend Corineus and his assertion that no one who calls themselves aContinue reading “C. S. Lewis on Myth (Part IV)”

C. S. Lewis on Myth (Part III)

This post is part of an ongoing series examining C. S. Lewis’s view of “myth.” In Miracles, Lewis reflects on the importance of myth in regards to the Old Testament and Israel. Lewis writes that “The Hebrews, like other people, had mythology: but as they were the chosen people so their mythology was the chosen mythologyContinue reading “C. S. Lewis on Myth (Part III)”

C. S. Lewis on Myth (Part II)

This post is part of an ongoing series examining C. S. Lewis’s view of “myth.” In An Experiment in Criticism, Lewis approached “myth” in several ways, most importantly as a story which has “a value in itself –a value independent of its embodiment in any literary work” (Experiment in Criticism, 41). Here Lewis defined mythContinue reading “C. S. Lewis on Myth (Part II)”

C. S. Lewis on Myth (Part I)

Most people do not like being told that they are wrong. This is especially true when it comes to politics or religious faith. Interestingly, a number of pundits and scholars have taken to calling religious faith “myth” in recent years, especially religious faith that for many adherents hinges upon certain events that claim to beContinue reading “C. S. Lewis on Myth (Part I)”