A Brief History of Communion: Medieval Christianity

This post is part of an ongoing series on the history of communion. The Medieval Church During the medieval period, the Church began to use a common liturgy for Eucharistic celebration, with prescribed texts and traditions for services and practice. Some differences emerged between the Eastern and Western branches of Christianity, differences which were formalizedContinue reading “A Brief History of Communion: Medieval Christianity”

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On the Misuse of Christian Tradition: A Response

The proper relationship between the authority of Christian Scripture and authority of Christian Tradition avails itself to no easy answers. From a historical viewpoint, much of the early development of both remains hotly debated. From a theological perspective, centuries (and sometimes millennia) old debates continue to shape thinking and lead toward answers long before anyContinue reading “On the Misuse of Christian Tradition: A Response”

Blogging and Saint Patrick

The past two weekends have been especially busy, as I’ve attended and presented at two conferences. The first was ‘That They May Be One’: The Past, Present, and Future of Orthodox-Catholic Dialogue”, hosted by Saint Louis University and the St. Irenaeus Orthodox Theological Institute. Though I am neither Orthodox or Catholic (yet, as my colleaguesContinue reading “Blogging and Saint Patrick”

Looking Ahead to Fall 2015

Greetings dear readers! After a busy and exciting summer, I’m looking forward to another informative (and similarly busy) fall term here in Saint Louis. As promised a couple of weeks ago, this post is intended to a) share what went on with me this summer and b) look ahead to what’s going on this fall.Continue reading “Looking Ahead to Fall 2015”

Bible Translations, Not Inspired (Redux)

Some time ago I published a brief reflection titled “Bible Translations, Not Inspired,” in which I argued that we must not assume that our contemporary Bibles—because they are translations—are the same thing as the inspired (inherent) words of God. While I don’t want to disagree with that post, I do want to reflect upon theContinue reading “Bible Translations, Not Inspired (Redux)”

Book Review: Restoring All Things (Smith and Stonestreet)

“Christians are called to live for the good of the world. This requires understanding and action. We must think clearly about the world and engage deeply when and where we can.” In his essay “On the Reading of Old Books”, C.S. Lewis once admonished his readers to engage numerous old books for every new bookContinue reading “Book Review: Restoring All Things (Smith and Stonestreet)”

Numbering the Psalms?

The Psalms have long been the hymnal of Christian worship. Jesus and his disciples sang the psalms of the Hebrew Bible and the practice continued with Paul and other early followers of Christ. In fact, insofar as we can tell, Christians of the first two centuries used the Psalm more than any other book ofContinue reading “Numbering the Psalms?”

PRV2: Protestant-Catholic Dialogue

This post is part of our ongoing series examining Protestant Reactions to Vatican II. Another facet of the Second Vatican Council that has garnered a variety of responses from Protestant Christians involves those documents discussing the relationship between the Roman Catholic Church and other Christian Churches. While not universally affirmed, the general perspective of ProtestantContinue reading “PRV2: Protestant-Catholic Dialogue”

PRV2: Divine Revelation and the Church

This post is part of our ongoing series examining Protestant Reactions to Vatican II. Dei verbum and Lumen gentium, the constitutions on Divine Revelation and the Church, respectively, remain two of the most discussed documents among Protestants responding to Vatican II. Historically such interest follows from the concerns of the Protestant Reformation, where early reformersContinue reading “PRV2: Divine Revelation and the Church”

Living Conciliarly

“Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.”–Stephen R. Covey I have forgotten where I first saw that quote, but I do remember that I was immediately impressed with its accurate assessment of contemporary culture and discourse. How often do we listen, discuss, or read withContinue reading “Living Conciliarly”