Book Review: The NIV Proclamation Bible

NIV Proclamation BibleWriting a book review on a book of such importance as the Bible constitutes a unique experience regardless of how many times one has undertaken the process. Most book reviews focus on the meaning, implications, and history behind the content of a publication. With the Christian Bible, however, these tasks are insurmountable in a single book review, for these questions are the purview of the life of the Church as well as whole academic fields. Thus, as I have said before, attempting to summarize the contents of the Bible for a mere book review remains foolishness at best, since could not possible hope to do justice to what must be said.

Musings on reviewing Bibles aside, this particular review examines the New International Version Proclamation Bible (Zondervan, 2013).[1] As with nearly every translation or version of the Christian scriptures, the contents of this Bible are well worth reading and are commended to readers and listeners everywhere. This general affirmation in mind, the duration of this review will focus on three aspects of the Proclamation Bible: the “Proclamation” Front Matter, two front cover designations, and some general notes on the style and construction of this particular Bible. Continue reading

Book Review: The NIV Journey Bible

NIV Journey BibleAs noted previously on this website, writing a book review of the Bible remains something of a daunting task. Yet reading and reviewing important literature constitutes a central part of what pursuing truth is all about. The Bible we are reviewing today is the New International Version The Journey Bible[1], which is all about “Revealing God and How You Fit Into His Plan.”[2] This Bible has peaceful, water-colored cover, and is sturdily constructed for a paperback. There are always concerns about how long a paperback cover will last for a book as thick as the Bible, but Zondervan’s years of experience in this realm seem to have produced a quality Bible here. The best feature of the Journey Bible comes right at the beginning, in the “Read This First” section. Here the editors explain how this Bible is designed for people asking questions about God, how this version is not offended by intellectual rigor, and how the resources included are designed to help people along their journey to God, provided they approach the message within with an open mind. This seemed like the perfect opening to a seeker friendly Bible, and does an excellent job of setting the tone for an honest reading of the Bible text. [3] Continue reading

Book Review: NIV Teen Study Bible

NIV Teen Study BibleReviewing a Bible requires rumination upon the purpose of writing book reviews. Many a book review offers reflections upon on the meaning, implications, and history behind the content of publication. For the Christian Bible, however, these tasks involve entire academic fields within the Academy and constitute the life-work of the Church. Hence, to summarize the contents of the Bible for a mere review remains foolishness at best, for one could not possible hope to do justice to what must be said. And yet, though the contents of this book review focus on the style and structure of the NIV Teen Study Bible, we must not forget our need to study and live its contents, for as Ronald Reagan once said, “Within the covers of the Bible are the answers for all the problems men face.”

The Bible we are reviewing today is the updated New International Version Teen Study Bible[1] with features written by Larry and Sue Richards.[2] This Bible has catchy a catchy cover, and is sturdily constructed, though this leaves is somewhat large and heavy, at least at Teen Bibles go. The study features of this Bible are not your typical footnotes and commentary, but rather in-text features boxes explicating the meaning of the text, integrating real life into the messages of the Bible, summarizing key ideas, and offering panoramas into the metanarrative of the Bible story. These features, the preface, and introductions to each Biblical book are short and concise, and focus on the application of the text than on literary, historical, or specifically theological aspects of the books. For someone new to the Biblical text, the brevity of these introductory materials comes as a welcome relief from what is often a deluge of information included in a study Bible. Continue reading

Book Review: The Story of the Voice (Capes, Seay, Couch)

The Story of the VoiceAs most Christians are well aware, new editions of the Bible are produced on a regular basis. Walk into any Christian home or institution and, upon examining their Bibles, you are likely to discover a variety of editions and translations. The King James Version, the New International Version, the English Standard Version, the New Living Translation, the Message, the New American Standard Bible, the New Revised Standard Version; these are but a few of the popular Bible choices for English reading American Christians. One of the newest editions of the Bible to catch American Christianity by storm has been The Voice Bible. Though surrounded by controversy, this new translation developed out of a specific vision for a contemporary translation of the Bible, a vision that is recounted in The Story of the Voice.

Simply put, The Story of the Voice does just what its title suggests—it tells the story behind the creation of The Voice Bible. This work represents the perspectives of a number of people, notably those of three major contributors to The Voice translation itself, Houston Baptist University Professor David B. Capes, Ecclesia Church Pastor Chris Seay, and Thomas Nelson Associate Publisher James F. Couch Jr. in The Story of the Voice, these authors outline the basic history and thinking behind the formation of The Voice Bible, covering the formative considerations for a Bible translation designed specifically for the 21st century context. In comparison to other more recent translations/paraphrases (think of the NET Bible, the New Living Translation, or Eugene Peterson’s The Message), The Voice team sought to create a modern translation that came as close as possible to a literal rendering of the original texts in a way that moved Bible translation back into the realm of living art that appealed to contemporary readers. Continue reading