The Scriptures of Saint Patrick: Introduction

The Context, Influence, and Form of the Biblical Text in Patrick of Ireland’s Confessio Some fifteen hundred years after his death, Saint Patrick of Ireland remains one of the most recognizable representatives of the Christian tradition. Beloved by Catholic, Protestant, Orthodox, and partaker in riotous spring-time drinking alike, Patrick’s epic propagation of the Christian faithContinue reading “The Scriptures of Saint Patrick: Introduction”

MHT: Medieval and Reformation History

This post is part of an ongoing series reflecting on the appropriate approach to and method for historical theology. In the medieval period, conceptions of the changelessness of the Church solidified through the works of Bernard of Clairvaux, the Venerable Bede, Dante, and Otto of Freising.[6] Rome—which was generally not thought of as “fallen” untilContinue reading “MHT: Medieval and Reformation History”

Would Christ Have Come If Humanity Had Not Fallen?

Or, On the Value of Speculative Theology A common criticism of medieval Christianity theology centers on the practice of speculative theology, the asking of seemingly obscure questions which have little bearing (or none at all) upon the vicissitudes of human life or Christian faith. Perhaps the most common example of this are stories about medievalContinue reading “Would Christ Have Come If Humanity Had Not Fallen?”

Book Review: Believe (Frazee)

The Bible is a complex book, full of countless stories, prophecies, and genres of writing, each of which (ostensibly) applies to the Christian life in some way. It is no easy task, however, to read the entire Bible and grasp how each portion relates to the others or how 21st century Christians should engage theContinue reading “Book Review: Believe (Frazee)”

Luther’s Two Kingdoms: Critique

This post is part of our ongoing series on Luther’s Two Kingdoms. The common critique that Luther separates the kingdom of Christ and the kingdom of the world in such a manner that does not allow for meaningful Christian interaction within the world often stems from an understanding of Luther’s two kingdoms doctrine as highlyContinue reading “Luther’s Two Kingdoms: Critique”

PRV2: Divine Revelation and the Church

This post is part of our ongoing series examining Protestant Reactions to Vatican II. Dei verbum and Lumen gentium, the constitutions on Divine Revelation and the Church, respectively, remain two of the most discussed documents among Protestants responding to Vatican II. Historically such interest follows from the concerns of the Protestant Reformation, where early reformersContinue reading “PRV2: Divine Revelation and the Church”

PRV2: Conciliar Context

This post is part of our ongoing series examining Protestant Reactions to Vatican II. Before examining any specific reactions to Vatican II, we must negotiate several historical and methodological problems. The first is the issue of historical placement. Though nearly fifty years removed from the closing of the council, the chronological proximity of this studyContinue reading “PRV2: Conciliar Context”

Medieval Misconceptions

One of the problems of living in an age saturated with knowledge (or at least the claims to knowledge that circulate the portions of the internet that I seem to inhabit) is constantly running into misconceptions about the history of Christianity, especially about the Medieval Age. As we all probably know from personal experience, it’sContinue reading “Medieval Misconceptions”

Book Review: Revelations of Divine Love (Julian of Norwich)

In the history of the great theological and spiritual tradition known as Christianity, there have been a plentitude of insightful and profound writings by a heterogeneous mix of individuals and communities. In the nearly two millennia since the Jesus Movement began, only a choice few of these works have risen to the become the proverbialContinue reading “Book Review: Revelations of Divine Love (Julian of Norwich)”

Heiko Oberman on the Historical Luther

This post is part of our series on the Historical Luther. Today’s post examines the perspective of Heiko Oberman.   Heiko Oberman (d. 2001), in his book Luther: Man between God and the Devil, posits that “To understand Luther, we must read the history of his life from an unconventional perspective… in the light ofContinue reading “Heiko Oberman on the Historical Luther”