SSP: Confessio 11 and Isaiah 32

This post is part of an ongoing series on the Scriptures of Saint Patrick of Ireland.

Confessio 11 & Isaiah 32:4  
Patrick O’Loughlin (147) ‘The tongue of the stammerers will learn quickly to speak peace.’
  Bieler (63) & Conneely (32) Linguae balbutientes velociter discent loqui pacem.
Isaiah 32:4    
  Vulgate lingua balborum velociter loquetur et plane
  Vetus Latina N/A
  Septuaginta αἱ γλῶσσαι αἱ ψελλίζουσαι ταχὺ μαθήσονται λαλεῖν εἰρήνην

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SSP: Confessio 7 and Matthew 12

This post is part of an ongoing series on the Scriptures of Saint Patrick of Ireland.

Confessio 7 & Matthew 12:36
Patrick O’Loughlin (145) ‘I tell you, on the day of judgment men will render account for every careless word they utter’.
Bieler (61) & Conneely (30) Verbum otiosum quod locuti fuerint homines reddent pro eo rationem in die iudicii.
Matthew 12:36
Vulgate quoniam omne verbum otiosum quod locuti fuerint homines reddent rationem de eo in die iudicii
k (4th-5th c. Italy)[1] Quoniam omne verbum vacuum quod locuti fuerint homines reddent pro eo rationem in die iduicii
a (4th c. Italy)[2] Quonium omne verbum otiosum quod locuti fuerint  homines, reddent de eo rationem in die judicii
d (5th c. France)[3] Quoniam omne beruum vacum quod locuntur homines reddet pro eo rationem in de iducii

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SSP: Confessio 5 and Psalm 50

This post is part of an ongoing series on the Scriptures of Saint Patrick of Ireland.

Confessio 5 & Psalm 50:15
Patrick O’Loughlin (145) ‘Call upon me in the day of trouble; I will deliver you, and you shall glorify’.
Bieler (60) & Conneely (30) Invoca me in die tribulationis tuae et liberabo te et magnificabis me.
Psalm 50:15
Vulgate (49:15) Et invoca me in die tribulationis liberabo te et glorificabis me
b (5th c. Italy)[1] Et invoca me in die tribulationis et eximam te et glorificabi me
Anglo-Saxon Psalter (8th c.)[2] Invoca me in die tribulationis; eripam te, et magnificabis me.
Irish Psalter (8th-9th c.) Et invoca me in die tribulationis; liberabo te, et glorificabis me.

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The Scriptures of Saint Patrick: The Form of Patrick’s Bible

This post is part of an ongoing series on the Scriptures of Saint Patrick of Ireland.

Saint Patrick of Ireland

Saint Patrick of Ireland

In what constitutes the third part of this series, I examine the textual form of Patrick’s Bible. This type of study has not often been undertaken.[1] The situation is such that Marie de Paor has gone so far as to say that since “we do not now possess the actual version of the Old Latin Bible which Patrick probably used, the Latin text… in Jerome’s Vulgate, is the next best thing.”[2] However, this approach to the recovery of Patrick’s Biblical versions appears unnecessarily pessimistic and unfortunately simplistic. While we may not be able to recover the autographs which Patrick employed as his Biblical text, it does seem probable that extant manuscript forms can shed additional light on the form of Patrick’s Bible. Continue reading

SSP: What Were Saint Patrick’s Scriptures?

This post is part of an ongoing series on the Scriptures of Saint Patrick of Ireland.

Open BibleScripture has played an important role in the history of the Christian Church, and Patrick’s approach to and treatment of the biblical text accentuates a worldview that prioritizes scripture. This part of my study has focused on the scriptural universe of Patrick, as well as his place in that context. Contextually important are recognitions surrounding the liturgical quality of the early medieval Bible, the lack of single-volume complete Bibles, and the existence of two different Latin Bible translations, the Vetus Latina and Jerome’s Vulgate, which were often mixed in medieval manuscripts. Continue reading

SSP: The “Third Part” of Patrick’s Bible

This post is part of an ongoing series on the Scriptures of Saint Patrick of Ireland.

Early Church FathersBefore turning to our examination of the form of Patrick’s Bible, a brief word must be said concerning Patrick’s relationship with the “third part” of the New Testament:[1] the writings of the Church Fathers. While Hanson argues that Patrick was literally a man of one book who was not exposed to any substantial literature apart from the Biblical text,[2] many readers of Patrick have noted in the Confessio echoes and references to a number of non-canonical early Christian writings. Continue reading

SSP: The Contents of Patrick’s Bible (Part II)

This post is part of an ongoing series on the Scriptures of Saint Patrick of Ireland.

SaintPatrickShamrockRemembering the medieval context of non-pandect Bibles (that is, Bibles in multiple volumes), examining Patrick’s practice of scripture allusion and quotation provides insights into not only which biblical books were the most important for him, but also which scriptural writings he had access to at the time he wrote the Confessio. For a breakdown of the number of times that Patrick quotes or strongly alludes to a particular writing, I point readers to the registers included in Bieler, Conneely, Hanson, and O’Loughlin.[1] The following conclusions are gleaned from an examination of these registers and their notation of which books Patrick makes use of in the Confessio. Continue reading

SSP: The Contents of Patrick’s Bible (Part I)

This post is part of an ongoing series on the Scriptures of Saint Patrick of Ireland.

Gospel Writers

Gospel Writers

Patrick’s overarching approach to the scriptures in hand, I now turn to some more specific considerations of his citations from the Old and New Testaments. Of central importance for Patrick were the Gospels (primarily Matthew and Luke), Pauline Epistles (especially Romans and the Corinthian correspondences), and the Psalter.[1] To briefly touch on the value of these writings for Patrick, the Gospels served not only as the source for knowing Christ Jesus, but also provided the missionary impetus which guided Patrick’s life. His quotation of Matthew 24:14 and 28:19-20 in Confessio 40 stands as the clearest example of how these biblical texts provide the foundation for Patrick’s life and work.[2] Continue reading

SSP: Patrick’s Use of the Scriptures

This post is part of an ongoing series on the Scriptures of Saint Patrick of Ireland.

patrick21Anyone even remotely familiar with the contents of the Christian Bible cannot help but recognize Patrick’s near constant reliance upon the scriptures in his writings. In the words of J.B. Bury, Patrick “was a homo unius libri; but with that book, the Christian Scriptures, he was extraordinarily familiar. His writings are crowded with Scriptural sentences and phrases….”[1] There are few paragraphs of the Confessio which do not contain numerous allusions to the scriptures and quotations (sometimes streams of quotations) are never far from Patrick’s pen.[2] In short, Patrick’s writings exhibit consummate scriptural consciousness, being filled with biblical phraseology and literarily rooted in the verba of scripture.[3] Continue reading

SSP: The Vulgate

This post is part of an ongoing series on the Scriptures of Saint Patrick of Ireland.

Vulgate

Vulgate

The second major Latin version of the Bible circulating in the Middle Ages was the Vulgate. Commissioned by Pope Damasus in 383 CE, the Vulgate is commonly attributed as the work of Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus or, as he is better known, Jerome.[1] Jerome’s real contribution to the Vulgate came through his translation of the Hebrew text of the Old Testament (contra the Vetus Latina, which was largely translated from the Septuagint).[2] His revision of the Vetus Latina New Testament was just that—a revision—and in some of the later portions of the New Testament, even that term seems a bit strong for the way in which Jerome used the Vetus Latina to produce a “new” translation.[3] This leads to the complication that, for later portions of the New Testament, it is often quite difficult to distinguish between the Vetus Latina and Vulgate versions.[4] Continue reading