Jesus in the Apocalypse of John: Four Views on Revelation

This post is part of an ongoing series examining the Christology of the Apocalypse of John. Any interpretation of Revelation must, as a matter of primary hermeneutic importance, address the topic of how to deal with the whole of the Apocalypse of John. As demonstrated Steven Gregg’s masterful work, Revelation: Four Views, throughout Christian historyContinue reading “Jesus in the Apocalypse of John: Four Views on Revelation”

Jesus in the Apocalypse of John: A Christological Lacuna

This post is part of an ongoing series examining the Christology of the Apocalypse of John. While early Christological studies have rightly moved toward an “Early High” standard, the edges of this model remain underdeveloped, especially the Christology of the Apocalypse of John.[1] This tendency begins with Bousset’s effectively neglect of Revelation, an influence whichContinue reading “Jesus in the Apocalypse of John: A Christological Lacuna”

Jesus in the Apocalypse of John: Introduction

After nearly 2,000 years, the study of Christology—the study of the person, nature, and role of Jesus[1]—continues as a popular, relevant, and important realm of theological inquiry. Indeed, it would not be an overstatement to say that Christology forms the economic basis for all truly orthodox Christian theology.[2] Studies of the history of Christology—especially theContinue reading “Jesus in the Apocalypse of John: Introduction”

Book Review: Lord Jesus Christ (Hurtado)

Magnum opus remains a term best reserved for the crowning achievement of a scholar’s life and work, the pinnacle at the top of decades of research, writing, and sharpening arguments. These great works comprehensively examine and engage their field of work and, at their best, even redefine the field for years to come. Such isContinue reading “Book Review: Lord Jesus Christ (Hurtado)”

The Marcion Problem: Canon and Literature Formation (Part III)

This post is part of an ongoing series examining Marcion of Sinope and his influence of the formation of the New Testament canon. Common to the perspectives of Knox, Tyson, and Price is that Marcion not only formed the notion of a Christian canon, but also influenced the writing of the canonical Luke-Acts and conceptionsContinue reading “The Marcion Problem: Canon and Literature Formation (Part III)”

Reflections on the May Biblical Studies Carnival

Claude Mariottini has posted the May Biblical Studies Carnival over at his website — I would encourage you to visit his post and check out the very best of the Biblioblogging world from this past month. I reproduce here some of Dr. Mariottini’s opening comments, which I reflect upon below.

Numbering the Psalms?

The Psalms have long been the hymnal of Christian worship. Jesus and his disciples sang the psalms of the Hebrew Bible and the practice continued with Paul and other early followers of Christ. In fact, insofar as we can tell, Christians of the first two centuries used the Psalm more than any other book ofContinue reading “Numbering the Psalms?”

NT Canon: What You Need to Know

Most Christians, and I would dare say most Americans, know some basic things about the Christian New Testament. But many people don’t know (or don’t want to know) how the New Testament came into being. Some people seem to think that Gospels, Acts, Epistles, and Revelation fell from the sky in a nicely leather boundContinue reading “NT Canon: What You Need to Know”

Recommended Reading: July 26 – August 1

Below are this week’s collection of recommended blog posts from across the internet. As always, feel free to suggest other things I should be reading in the comments section below. May these links be as thought-provoking for you as they were for me. Cheers, JP Theology and Religion We have all seen (or been aContinue reading “Recommended Reading: July 26 – August 1”