The Divine Quest, East and West (Part III)

This post concludes a brief series of reflections on Jay Ford’s The Divine Quest, East and West. The Divine Quest: East and West provides an engaging, insightful, and balanced approach to considering the Ultimate in three (or four) major religious traditions. From the perspective of one most familiar with Christianity, I especially appreciated the wayContinue reading “The Divine Quest, East and West (Part III)”

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The Divine Quest, East and West (Part II)

This post continues a series of reflections on Jay Ford’s The Divine Quest, East and West. As part of The Divine Quest, East and West’s turn toward the East in Acts 4 and 5, this reflection deals with the Classical and Colonial periods of Hindu theology. In reviewing the schools of classical Hindu theology, Ford usefullyContinue reading “The Divine Quest, East and West (Part II)”

Book Review: Understanding the Times (Myers and Noebel)

Every so often a book comes along and truly rewrites the paradigms of a field. Some twenty-five years ago, David Noebel penned such a book, titled Understanding the Times. In this 900-page tome Noebel outlined the clash between competing worldviews – ways of viewing and interpreting the world – which were occurring throughout in theContinue reading “Book Review: Understanding the Times (Myers and Noebel)”

Book Review: A History of Christian-Muslim Relations (Goddard)

Islam and its relationship with Christianity remains a subject very much on the minds of many in today’s world. Indeed, for much of the past fifteen years the Western world and its media has routinely faced the question, “What is Islam and how does it affect us?” What few people seem to understand, however, isContinue reading “Book Review: A History of Christian-Muslim Relations (Goddard)”

Book Review: Perceptions of Islam in the Christendoms (Khan)

History is contested. Though far from a novel statement, we often need to be reminded that the past is not as clean and easy as our history textbooks make it out to be. This is especially true in matters of religious history and conflict, where seemingly everyone wants to contribute their two cents to hotContinue reading “Book Review: Perceptions of Islam in the Christendoms (Khan)”

Looking Ahead to Fall 2015

Greetings dear readers! After a busy and exciting summer, I’m looking forward to another informative (and similarly busy) fall term here in Saint Louis. As promised a couple of weeks ago, this post is intended to a) share what went on with me this summer and b) look ahead to what’s going on this fall.Continue reading “Looking Ahead to Fall 2015”

Book Review: Did God Really Command Genocide? (Copan and Flannagan)

Any contemporary reader who picks up the Bible will be struck by the seeming divide between the God of Jesus Christ and the God who commands the destruction of whole nations and the obliteration of Canaanites during Israel’s conquest of the Promised Land. And while many Christians simply don’t think about the possible difficulties ofContinue reading “Book Review: Did God Really Command Genocide? (Copan and Flannagan)”

Book Review: Fields of Blood (Armstrong)

For many people living in the West, an assumption exists that religion is inherently violent. After all, they say, just look at the evidence: religion has caused wars, the Crusades, terrorism, religion has made people hate and kill others for nothing more than the ideas that were in their heads. According to this view, religionsContinue reading “Book Review: Fields of Blood (Armstrong)”

Reflections on Vatican II

The Second Vatican Council (1962-5) stands apart as one of the single most important events of modern Church history, not only because of the number of Christians that the Church at Rome influences, but also because of the magnitude and depth of the canons of the council. While a thorough examination remains outside the parametersContinue reading “Reflections on Vatican II”

Second Treatise of Great Seth

The Second Treatise of the Great Seth is one of the “G/gnostic” texts found at the Nag Hammadi Library in Egypt.[1] Generally dated in the third century by scholars, the name and origin of this text remain a mystery,[2] though it has been speculated that the name Seth originated from the son of Adam andContinue reading “Second Treatise of Great Seth”