Recommended Reading: May 12

If you read one article this week, engage Evangelical Gnosticism by Abigail Rine Favale

For those of you with additional reading time this fine Spring day, check out the following selections, gathered from around the interwebs. Happy reading!

Theology and Churchworld

Lessons from the Worst Sermon I Ever Heard by Mike McKinley

Pope Francis, Nondenominationalist? by John Ehrett

Southern Baptist Women Launch Petition Against Paige Patterson by Kate Shellnutt

Miracles and Modernity by Benjamin Winter

Biblical Studies and the History of Christianity

April Biblical Studies Carnival by Ruben Rus

Gospels and Names by Larry Hurtado

Does Genesis Make Claims about History? by RJS

How Present Technology Changes Our View of Past Technology by Peter Gurry

Worldviews and Culture

“Avoidance Is Not Purity”: An Ode to the Pence Rule by Eric Hutchinson

Should Abused Women (or Men) Stay with Their Spouses? by Roger Olson

The Myth of Disenchantment by Peter Leithart

Empty Hands by Johanna Byrkett

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Recommended Reading: April 28

If you read one article this week, engage Why “The Prince of Egypt” is the Bible Movie Viewers Deserve.

For those of you with additional reading time this fine spring day, check out the following selections. Think I missed sharing something important? Let me know in the comment section below. Continue reading

Recommended Reading: December 9

If you read one article from this past week, engage Why You Should Surround Yourself With More Books Than You’ll Ever Have Time to Read by Jessica Stillman.

For those of you with additional reading time this wintery weekend, check out the following selections, gathered from around the blogging world (over the past few weeks, this time around). Think I missed sharing something important? Let me know in the comments section below. Continue reading

A Proposal: When the Rubber Meets the Road

This post is part of a proposal for approaching theology from the perspective of history.

When the Rubber Meets the Road

The final step of this process brings the historical insights of what the Shepherd of Hermas indicates about the teaching authority of woman into conversation with contemporary conversations about women in the church. Here, several factors play out. First, we must recognize that the Shepherd is not canonical, but it was extremely popular for large swaths of early Christians. That is, this was not some one-off work of a heretic that stands merely as something for Christians to reject; many Christians have found this work insightful and (in some sense) useful for their own lives. Second, the Shepherd comes from Rome, where we know Paul’s letters to the Corinthians were well known, indicating that Hermas’s community (at least) held the call for Grapte to teach and Paul’s message in 1 Corinthians 14:34-35 in conjunction. Continue reading

A Proposal: Application

This post is part of a proposal for approaching theology from the perspective of history.

Women in the Apostolic Fathers

As an application of this approach, I want to quickly examine conceptions of women which appear in the early Christian writings known as the Apostolic Fathers. To keep this example as brief as possible, consider one instance where a female character appears in the apocalyptic account known as the Shepherd of Hermas (c. 100-150 CE).4 In Vision 2.4.3, Hermas records being told by an angel the following: “And so, you will write two little books, sending one to Clement and the other to Grapte. Clement will send his to the foreign cities, for that is his commission. But Grapte will admonish the widows and orphans. And you will read yours in this city, with the presbyters who lead the church.” Continue reading