Jesus in the Apocalypse of John: Names

This post is part of an ongoing series examining the Christology of the Apocalypse of John. New Testament Studies has long been concerned with understanding the theological implications of early Christian titles for Jesus.[1] Before examining the names applied to Jesus in the Apocalypse, a word of caution should be offered about these titles, forContinue reading “Jesus in the Apocalypse of John: Names”

Jesus in the Apocalypse of John: Four Views on Revelation

This post is part of an ongoing series examining the Christology of the Apocalypse of John. Any interpretation of Revelation must, as a matter of primary hermeneutic importance, address the topic of how to deal with the whole of the Apocalypse of John. As demonstrated Steven Gregg’s masterful work, Revelation: Four Views, throughout Christian historyContinue reading “Jesus in the Apocalypse of John: Four Views on Revelation”

Jesus in the Apocalypse of John: A Christological Lacuna

This post is part of an ongoing series examining the Christology of the Apocalypse of John. While early Christological studies have rightly moved toward an “Early High” standard, the edges of this model remain underdeveloped, especially the Christology of the Apocalypse of John.[1] This tendency begins with Bousset’s effectively neglect of Revelation, an influence whichContinue reading “Jesus in the Apocalypse of John: A Christological Lacuna”

Jesus in the Apocalypse of John: Introduction

After nearly 2,000 years, the study of Christology—the study of the person, nature, and role of Jesus[1]—continues as a popular, relevant, and important realm of theological inquiry. Indeed, it would not be an overstatement to say that Christology forms the economic basis for all truly orthodox Christian theology.[2] Studies of the history of Christology—especially theContinue reading “Jesus in the Apocalypse of John: Introduction”

Christology in “O Come, O Come Emmanuel”

“O Come, O Come Emmanuel” is a popular Christmas hymn written by an anonymous Latin author in the twelfth century and translated into English in 1851 by John Mason Neale. The hymn contains nine verses, all of which contain statements about Christ. The name “Jesus” and title “Christ” do not actually appear in the hymn;Continue reading “Christology in “O Come, O Come Emmanuel””

Ep12: Who is God?

The past several weeks of the Church Debates podcast have been wrestling with the Christological Controversies. This episode wraps up the ancient ecumenical councils by looking at the Council of Chalcedon and the doctrine of the Trinity.

Ep11: Is Mary the Mother of God?

In this episode of the Church Debates series, we ask if Mary is the Mother of God, wrestle with the Marian dogmas, and talk about how the Theotokos controversy impacted the Christology debates of the Council of Ephesus.

Ep10: Is Jesus Fully Man?

This episode of the Church Debates series examines Christology between the Council of Nicaea (325) and the Council of Constantinople (381), with particular emphasis on the question of whether Jesus was fully human or not.

Ep9: Is Jesus Fully God?

This episode of the Church Debate series looks at the questions and context of the Council of Nicaea, introducing early Christology and focusing on the different theologies of Arius and Athanasius.

God Made Man (Part II)

Between the Council of Nicaea (325 AD) and the Council of Chalcedon (451 AD), many controversies erupted from the Alexandrian and Antiochene positions on the person of Christ.[16] The Council of Constantinople (381 AD) condemned the belief of Apollinarius that Christ only had one will, that of the divine.[17] While the Church believed that ChristContinue reading “God Made Man (Part II)”