Book Review: Irresistible (Stanley)

Once upon a time, there existed a version of Christianity that was irresistible. Over the years, however, errors and accretions have piled up, reducing to a shadow what was once a robust proclamation of the Good News of Jesus. But now, there’s a way that the Church can return to its roots and make the gospel great again.

No, this isn’t another book about the corruptions of Catholicism that the Protestant Reformation overcame; it’s the story of American Protestantism, which has sadly lost its way in the wilderness of the Old Testament and a “Bible-before-Jesus” approach to sharing Jesus. Continue reading

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Orthodoxy and Relevance

Christians have long talked about life as a journey, whether as runners or pilgrims or travelers or something else. Journeys tend to involve forks in the road, decisions to make, and obstacles to overcome. Sometimes, the decisions of this journey are between light and darkness, holiness and sin, redemption and backsliding. In these instances, the follower of Christ is called to choose the path of faithfulness. Other times, however, the decisions we make along the way do not seem to be inherently good or bad—it’s not immediately clear whether one path is better than the other.

Such an image of journey has been on my mind lately as I’ve wrestled with what seems to be an increasingly common trope for contemporary Christians: the ongoing debate between orthodoxy and relevance.

Per Merriam-Webster, orthodoxy means “right belief, sound doctrine” and relevance means “the quality or state of being closely connected or appropriate.” Based on those definitions, you wouldn’t expect contemporary Christians to believe that orthodoxy and relevance are at odds with one another. But if you talk to many Christians, you’d be wrong. Let me explain. Continue reading

Book Review: Best Question Ever

The Best Question EverI recently read The Best Question Ever: A Revolutionary Approach to Decision Making by Andy Stanley. In writing to help his readers better understand how to make the right choices in life and to avoid regrets, Stanley offers very simply advice. When faced with a situation or opportunity of any kind, one must simply ask the “Best Question Ever”: What is the wise thing to do? Stanley explains with some detail the biblical and practical basis for asking this question and why a reflexive attitude towards life decisions is important. He then proceeds to offer suggestions on the implementation of this question into life through issues of time, money, and morality. He closes with an appropriate section for a pastor, writing that true wisdom can only be found within a relationship with God. Continue reading