Recommended Reading: June 20-26

361863-remembering-those-who-died-in-charleston-church-shooting-03147If you read one article this week, engage “I Forgive You” by Dominic Bouck.

If you have time for more reading this weekend, check out the following selections from around the internet. As always, if you think there is something else I need to be reading, feel free to let me know in the comments below. Continue reading

Recommended Readings: May 9-15

keep-calm-and-follow-the-golden-rules-8If you read one article this week, engage Do or Don’t Do: The Golden Rule and Its Negative by Kevin Bywater.

If you have more reading time, check out the following suggestions from around the blogosphere. As always, if you think there is something else I should be reading, feel free to let me know in the comments section below. Continue reading

Rethinking Christianity?

ThinkingA while back I posed a question to my Facebook friends: “Do we need to rethink Christianity?” I asked this question in response to an article concerning the need for part of the Christian Church (specifically, the Roman Catholic Church) to rethink its stance on numerous doctrinal points. Now whether you think the Roman Catholic Church (and/or other more conservative portions of the Christian family) should reconsider the appropriate theology and practice concerning the role of women in the church and definition of marriage, I think that pondering the potential implications of “rethinking Christianity” is important. Continue reading

Reflections on the Institute for Creation Research

Institute for Creation ResearchThe topic of “Creation versus Evolution,” at least in many circles, often elicits a good deal of debate, many times in rather a heated manner. The point of this post is not to provoke strong emotions in anyone, but only to offer a few thoughts about the Institute for Creation Research, an outspoken advocate of scientific “Creationism.” The integration of faith and reason in science has been an important consideration for many American Protestant Christians over the past 120 years. In the early 1900’s, intellectual change on a number of levels was sweeping across America, especially in relation to biological science. In 1925, the Scopes Trial in Dayton, TN made Darwin’s Theory of Natural Selection (first published in 1859) and brought a creation/evolution dichotomy to the forefront of American culture. Over the next few decades, the increasingly divided American Church responded to an increasingly secular scientific culture in a variety of ways. Many of the more “liberal” denominations acclimated to the changes in the philosophy of science, while many “conservative” denominations either fought against such changes or (more often) merely abandoned serious scientific inquiry altogether. By the 1970’s, the divide on creation and evolution was nearly complete, a divide that has directly impacted the nature of American Christianity on a variety of topics (scientific, theological, ethical, and political) since. Continue reading

Recommended Readings: January 24-30

bodleianmanuscriptIf you read one article this week, engage A First-Century Copy of the Gospel of Mark? by Larry Hurtado

For those of you with additional time to read a smattering of suggestions from this week (and late last), I encourage you to consider the selection below. As always, if you think there’s something else I should be reading, feel free to let me know in the comments section below. Continue reading

A (Free) College Education for Everyone?

This article originally appeared at Conciliar Post.
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Magdalen College, Oxford

You may have heard that last week President Obama announced an initiative to provide “free” community college education for qualifying students, tentatively defined as those maintaining a “C” average in school. As noted several months ago here at Conciliar Post, the status quo of the American education system needs reform, as the overall monetary and policy prioritization of K-12 education has done relatively little to effectively educate America’s youth and prepare them for their future vocations.1 Few deny that something needs to change in education, though conclusions as to just what that something is remain debated. The purposes of this article involve neither rehashing these concerns nor reacting to our President’s particular proposal—for actual details are scant at this point.2 Rather, this article considers the generalities of “free college education” for everyone, just one part of the greater “education question” that faces our nation. To these ends, I reflect on three questions concerning the cost, need, and implications of a program offering “free” community college education. Continue reading